know

the disease

diphtheria

What is diphtheria?

     Diphtheria is an infection caused by the Corynebacterium diphtheriae bacterium. This bacteria can get into and attach to the lining of the respiratory system. The bacteria can produce a toxin that can cause weakness, sore throat, fever, and swollen glands in the neck. The toxin destroys healthy tissues in the respiratory system and within two to three days, the dead tissue forms a thick, gray coating that can build up in the throat or nose called a “pseudomembrane.” It can cover tissues in the nose, tonsils, voice box, and throat, making it hard to breathe and swallow.

 

How does it spread?

     It transmits from person to person through respiratory droplets (like coughing or sneezing) or the bacteria can also linger on surfaces and be picked up that way. An infected person is usually no longer contagious 48 hours after they begin taking antibiotics.

What are the chances?

     There is an occasional case of Diphtheria every few years but is pretty rare in the United States.

Is there a treatment or cure?

    Yes, antibiotics kill the bacteria and an anti-toxin is used to stop damage to the body from the toxin produced by the bacteria. 

Can I get diphtheria if vaccinated?

Yes.

 

tetanus

"Wounds that bleed will never result in tetanus because the tetanus bacillus is anaerobic. It is absolutely silly to vaccinate boys who cut their knees. The only reason behind that is money." - Dr. Buchwald MD

What is tetanus?

      When Clostridium tetani bacteria enters your body and thrives on an anaerobic environment, it can lead to tetanus which is also referred to as "lockjaw". Typically the muscles in the jaw can tighten and cause problems opening the mouth, swallowing, and in extreme cases breathing. Other symptoms include fever, sweating, headache, seizures, and muscle spasms. Tetanus can be a serious illness.

     The key is that with proper wound care without neglect or the presence of diabetes/circulatory disorders, there is little to no chance of developing tetanus even after contracting this bacteria.

     An anaerobic environment means that for the bacteria to survive, the environment must be oxygen free. This is where the myth of tetanus coming from a rusty nail originated since that would typically result in a puncture wound. In reality it would have to be a deep wound that does not bleed and is never exposed to oxygen. The wound would also have to have been contaminated with the clostridium tetani bacteria. This bacteria is really only prevalent in the intestines of animals so for instance the soil on a farm would be more likely to have this bacteria in it. The bacteria would then have to thrive in the body long enough to complete a life cycle. The toxins emitted when it dies are what cause the symptoms of tetanus. 

     The incubation period is anywhere from 3 to 21 days with an average of 8 days.

How does it spread?

From the CDC website:

"Tetanus is different from other vaccine-preventable diseases because it does not spread from person to person. The bacteria are usually found in soil, dust, and manure and enter the body through breaks in the skin - usually cuts or puncture wounds caused by contaminated objects.

Today, tetanus is uncommon in the United States, with an average of about 30 reported cases each year."

What are the chances?

     If there are only around 30 reported cases per year this puts the likelihood of contracting tetanus in the U.S. at 1 in 10,998,954 (almost 11 million). And just to be clear, the quote above also means "herd immunity" or "community immunity" does not apply here. This does not spread from person to person. 

Is there a treatment or cure?

Yes.

     If for any reason you or your trusted doctor assess a risk of tetanus, there is the option of the Tetanus Immunoglobulin or TiG. If there is an attempt to administer to DTaP or TDaP vaccine as a "cure" or "treatment" for tetanus, this is NOT how a vaccine works. The vaccine takes weeks to take effect and will not help in an actual case of tetanus. Be clear in requesting the Immunoglobulin.

Can I get tetanus if vaccinated?

Yes.

Other important information:

     There is no single tetanus vaccine available. It is only available in a combination vaccine.

pertussis

What is pertussis?

     Also known as "Whooping Cough" or "100 Day Cough", Pertussis is caused by the bacteria "Bordatella pertussis". Symptoms are similar to the common cold: runny nose, fever, and mild cough. This is often followed by weeks of severe coughing fits. 

 

How does it spread?

     An infected person can spread the disease to another person by coughing or sneezing or being in close contact. Pertussis is most contagious up to around 2 weeks after the cough begins. Antibiotics can shorten this time frame.

What are the chances?

     According to the CDC, there were 18,975 cases in 2017 so that makes it a 1 in 17,390 chance of getting Pertussis. It's not uncommon especially in children. 

Is there a treatment or cure?

Pertussis can be treated with antibiotics.

Can I get Pertussis if vaccinated?

Yes.

     In fact, there is a primate study from 2013 showing the the acellular Pertussis vaccine does not protect against infection OR transmission, it merely suppresses symptoms. This increases the chances of a vaccinated individual infected with pertussis but showing few to no symptoms going about their usual activities in public and infecting others. 

    Another study published in 2019 shows that the DTaP vaccine increases lifetime susceptibility to pertussis infection.

Other important information:

     This means that this does not fall under "herd immunity" or "community immunity" theory. This vaccine only lessens symptoms in the case of a vaccinated individual contracting pertussis. It does NOT prevent infection or transmission.

"Doesn't give lifetime immunity and in fact increases susceptibility to pertussis over a lifetime: All children primed by DTaP vaccines will be more susceptible to pertussis (Whooping Cough) throughout their lifetimes and there is no easy way to decrease this increased lifetime susceptibility." - Dr. James Cherry

haemophilus influenzae 

 

What is Haemophilus Influenzae?

     H. Influenzae (including type B) is bacteria that can most commonly result in pneumonia (lung infection), bacteremia (bloodstream infection), meningitis (infection of tissue in the brain and spinal cord), epiglotittis (throat swelling), cellulitis (skin infection), or infectious arthritis. It also can result in mild ear infections in children and bronchitis in adults. 

How does it spread?

     These 6 types (A - F) of bacteria live in the nose and throat, and usually cause no harm. An infected person can spread H. influenzae, including Hib (type B that is vaccinated against), to others through respiratory droplets. This happens when someone who has the bacteria in their nose or throat coughs or sneezes. People who are not sick but have the bacteria in their noses and throats can still spread it. That is how H. influenzae spreads most of the time. 

What are the chances?

     HiB mainly affects children five and under (most of those in children under 2 years) and the elderly. In the U.S., there are around 25 cases per year in children 5 and under. 

Is there a treatment or cure?

     Yes. Antibiotics are used for around 10 days to treat the infection if there are no further complications. Secondary infections can be serious and cause irreversible damage.

Can I get H. Influenzae if vaccinated?

Yes.

hepatitis a

What is Hepatitis A? 

     Hepatitis A is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). It can range from a mild illness lasting weeks to a severe illness lasting months. 

 

How does it spread? 

     Hepatitis A usually spreads when a person unknowingly ingests the virus from objects, food, or drinks contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool from an infected person.

What are the chances? 

     According to data from 2017 you have about a 1 in 48,520 chance of contracting Hep A.

Is there a treatment or cure? 

     To treat the symptoms, doctors usually recommend rest, good nutrition, and fluids. It can take a few months before people with hepatitis A begin to feel better.

Can I get Hep A if vaccinated? 

Yes.

 

hepatitis b

What is Hepatitis B?

     It is a liver infection caused by the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV). For some, Hepatitis B is an acute (short term) illness but for others it can become a long-term, chronic infection. Chronic Hep B can lead to cirrhosis or liver cancer.

How does it spread?

     The Hep B virus is transmitted when blood, semen, or body fluid from an infected person enters someone who is not infected. This can happen through sexual contact; sharing needles, syringes, or other similar equipment; or from mother to baby at birth. Fewer than 0.1% of U.S. mothers have Hep B, so 99.9% of American babies aren't at risk of contracting it from their mother. 

What are the chances?

     According to the CDC, there were 3,409 reported cases in 2017 which puts the risk at 1 in 96,794. 

Is there a treatment or cure?

     An injection of immunoglobulin given within 12 hours of exposure to the virus may help protect against infection. If it is an acute infection, the usual treatment recommended is rest, proper nutrition, and plenty of fluids. In severe cases antiviral drugs or a hospital stay is needed to prevent complications. 

     Those diagnosed with a chronic Hep B infection will need lifelong treatment including antiviral medications, interferon injections, or in severe cases where liver damage has been done: a liver transplant.

Can I get Hep B if vaccinated?

Yes. 

Other important information:

     The Hep B vaccine is first administered at birth. When mother is negative for Hepatitis B, this is unnecessary and incredibly dangerous. Any "protection" from this vaccine would wane long before it would prove beneficial.

influenza

What is influenza?

     Influenza (the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and sometimes the lungs. It can cause mild to severe illness. Symptoms can include: fever, chills, sore throat, runny/stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headaches, fatigue, vomiting, or diarrhea.

 

How does it spread?

     Flu viruses are believed to be spread mainly by tiny droplets made when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby. Less often, it can be spread on surfaces.

What are the chances?

     The flu is quite common, however many cases that present with flu-like symptoms are not the flu. Depending on the season, around 3-11% (with an average of 8%) of the population have symptomatic flu illness. 

Is there a treatment or cure?

     Yes. Antiviral drugs may be a treatment option or over the counter drugs to help with symptoms. Often plenty of fluids, good nutrition, and rest is recommended.

Can I get the flu if vaccinated?

Yes.

 

measles

What is Measles?

     Measles (Rubeola) is a virus. Symptoms appear 10-12 days after infection. Those infected with the virus typically present with a high fever, runny nose, cough, red or watery eyes, and a full body rash. Tiny white spots (Koplik spots) may appear inside the mouth as an early symptom around day 2 or 3. Between days 3 and 5 the rash appears starting around the hairline and face and spreading down the rest of the body. This is usually when the fever spikes higher. Complications are most likely to occur in poorly nourished children, especially those with a Vitamin A deficiency. 

How does it spread?

     Measles is transmitted via droplets from the nose, mouth, or throat of an infected person.

What are the chances?

Risk of contracting Measles in the U.S. is currently around 1 in 258,738. 

Is there a treatment or cure?

     According to Mayo Clinic, "There is no specific treatment for an established Measles infection". They also state that Vitamin A can be administered to lessen severity and prevent complications. Symptoms should improve within 7-10 days so most often doctors recommend good nutrition, Vitamin A & C, hydration, and rest. 

Can I get Measles if vaccinated?

Yes. 

     There are 24 different genotypes or strains for measles. The MMR vaccine only targets genotype "A". The CDC did molecular characterization to determine the genotype in the Disney outbreak in 2015 and labeled it as genotype "B3". The outbreaks in Washington in 2019 were classified as "D8". 

The vaccine would not have prevented these outbreaks.

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/measles/lab-tools/genetic-analysis.html

http://emergency.cdc.gov/HAN/han00376.asp

http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/204/suppl_1/S514.full

"Genotyping is also the only way to distinguish whether a person has wild-type measles virus infection, or a rash caused by a recent measles vaccination. A small percentage of measles vaccine recipients experience rash and fever 10 to 14 days following vaccination. During outbreaks, measles vaccine is administered to help control the outbreak, and in these situations, vaccine reactions may be mistakenly classified as measles cases." - CDC 

 

mumps

What is Mumps?

     Mumps is an illness caused by a virus. It usually shows up as a few days of fever, muscle aches, fatigue, loss of appetite, and headache. For most, this is followed by swelling of the salivary glands which causes the puffy cheeks and a tender swollen jaw. 

How does it spread?

     Mumps spreads through direct contact with saliva or respiratory droplets from the mouth, nose, or throat most often by talking, coughing, or sneezing. An infected person is generally no longer contagious around 5 days after symptoms begin.

What are the chances?

     In 2019 there were approximately 3,474 cases of the mumps reported in the U.S. This puts your chances at about 1 in 93,746. 

Is there a treatment or cure?

     According to Mayo Clinic, most children and adults recover from an uncomplicated case of the mumps within a few weeks. Rest, good nutrition, and plenty of fluids is often the recommended treatment.

Can I get the mumps if vaccinated?

Yes.

rubella

What is Rubella?

     Rubella or "german measles" is an illness caused by a virus. Most people who get it have a mild illness with symptoms that can include a low grade fever, sore throat, and full body rash. Rubella can cause complications with pregnancy if an expectant mother contracts it. 

 

How does it spread?

     Rubella spreads through direct contact with saliva or respiratory droplets from the mouth, nose, or throat most often by talking, coughing, or sneezing. An infected person may spread the disease to others up to one week before and after the rash appears. 25% to 50% of people infected with rubella are asymptomatic.

What are the chances?

Less than 10 cases are reported in the U.S. per year. 

Is there a treatment or cure?

     Many cases are asymptomatic. For others, mild symptoms can be managed with bed rest, good nutrition, and plenty of fluids. 

Can I get rubella if vaccinated?

Yes.

 

polio

What is polio?

The Polio virus is a virus that attacks the nervous system.

How does it spread?

Polio transmits through contact with infected feces. It is possible for it to transmit through a cough or a sneeze but is very unlikely. 

What are the chances?

The last reported case of polio in the U.S. was in 1993.

 

     According to Merck, it's estimated that 90% of infected individuals are asymptomatic but can still spread the virus. This is known as subclinical polio. Around 5% develop abortive polio which can last from 2 to 5 days and can present with flu-like symptoms. Another 3% develop non-paralytic polio which includes some limb weakness and numbness.

     This 98% had a complete recovery (and have lifelong immunity) and the symptoms resolved within 10-14 days. About 2% (slightly less) had paralytic polio. Of this 2%, there are 3 subcategories, but among the 3 more than 50% had a complete recovery rate and in the other almost 50% some had a longer recovery, and some did not fully recover - having some paralysis and some died. 

     Of this 2% with paralytic polio, 2% had bulbar polio which was the horrific kind shown on TV (that's less than .04% of the people that contracted polio)

Is there a treatment or cure?

     Treatment consists of helping to speed recovery along by making the infected individual comfortable with pain relievers, rest, and fluids. Depending on the type of polio that is being treated, if there is difficulty breathing, a ventilator may be necessary to assist breathing or some light exercise to prevent loss of muscle function. 

     Iron lungs are a thing of the past though many people associate them with polio. Ventilators are what is used now to assist patients in breathing. They're used every day in hospitals for many different illnesses.

Can I get Polio if vaccinated?

Yes.

In fact, vaccines have in the past, and even as recent as 2019, been reported as causing polio outbreaks.

History

     Prior to 1954, the following undoubtedly hid behind the name "poliomyelitis": Transverse Myelitis, viral or aseptic meningitis, Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) - (what Franklin Delano Roosevelt is likely to have had), Chinese Paralytic Syndrome, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, epidemic cholera, cholera morbus, spinal meningitis, spinal apoplexy, inhibitory palsy, intermittent fever, famine fever, worm fever, bilious remittent fever, ergotism, post-polio syndrome, acute flaccid paralysis (AFP): enteroviral encephalopathy, traumatic neuritis, Reye's Syndrome.

     A pesticide common in the 1800's was called Paris Green. A green liquid because it was a combination of copper and arsenic or lead and arsenic. This pesticide worked by causing neurological damage in the bugs, causing organ failure. Polio consists of symptoms synonymous with neurological damage, causing organ failure. Heavy metal poisoning from lead, mercury and other similar heavy metals manifest lesions on neurological tissues, meaning the toxin destroys the nerve/communication pathways connecting the brain to the organs in the body.

     Polio victims present with lesions on neurological tissue, that cause the organs to malfunction all around the body. (lungs, heart, nerves that control walking etc) Polio outbreaks hit throughout the summer, only during pesticide spraying times. (not during the sunless and damp winter/spring seasons regarding other disease outbreaks) Polio infected clusters of people in the exact same areas, suddenly and swiftly. 

   Parents report finding their children paralyzed in and around apple orchards. One of the most heavily pesticide sprayed crops of the time (with lead arsenate or copper arsenate) were apple orchards. President Roosevelt became paralyzed over night while on his farm in the summer, which contained many crops, including apple orchards. He also swam the day prior in a bay that was heavily polluted by industrial agricultural run off. 

     Dr. Ralph Scobey and Dr. Mortind Biskind testified in front of the U.S Congress in 1951 that the paralysis around the country known as polio was being caused by industrial poisons and that a virus theory was purposely fabricated by the chemical industry and the government to deflect litigation away from both parties. Find more details here

     In 1956 the AMA (The American Medical Association) put out a notice to all licensed medical doctors that they could no longer classify polio as polio, or they would lose their license. Any paralysis was now to be diagnosed as AFP (acute flaccid paralysis) MS, MD, Bell's Palsy, cerebral palsy, ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease), Guillian-Barre, meningitis, etc.

According to Dr. Greenberg, head of the department of Biostatistics of the University of North Carolina School of Public Health: In order to qualify for classification as paralytic poliomyelitis, the patient had to exhibit paralytic symptoms for at least 60 days after the onset of the disease. Prior to 1954, the patient had to exhibit paralytic symptoms for only 24 hours. Laboratory confirmation and the presence of residual paralysis were not required. After 1954, residual paralysis was determined 10 to 20 days and again 50 to 70 days after the onset of the disease. This change in definition meant that in 1955 we started reporting a new disease, namely, paralytic poliomyelitis with a longer lasting paralysis.

     This gave the impression that polio was eradicated by the vaccine campaign but because the polio vaccine contained ingredients directly linked to paralysis, polio cases (not identified as polio) were vastly increasing but only in vaccinated areas. 

rotavirus

What is rotavirus?

Rotavirus is a virus that causes diarrhea. 

 

How does it spread?

     Rotavirus is spread through fecal matter from an infected person. The virus can live on surfaces for weeks or longer if they have not been disinfected. Infants and children make up the majority of those affected.

What are the chances?

Chances of getting rotavirus in the U.S. is around 1 in 100 so it's very common.

Is there a treatment or cure?

"Although rotavirus infections are unpleasant, you can usually treat this infection at home with extra fluids to prevent dehydration. Occasionally, severe dehydration requires intravenous fluids in the hospital." - Mayo Clinic

Can I get Rotavirus even if vaccinated?

Yes.

varicella

What is Varicella?

     Varicella (Chicken Pox) is an infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus. Symptoms can include an itchy rash, fever, loss of appetite, headache, body aches, and fatigue.

 

How does it spread?

Varicella can spread three ways: through direct contact, indirect contact, and airborne spread.

What are the chances?

Chances are around 1 in 32,500 in the U.S.

Is there a treatment or cure?

     Often what is recommended is calamine lotion, a cool bath with baking soda or oatmeal, and the usual good nutrition, fluids, and rest. It's not recommended to give ibuprofen as it can lead to complications and serious skin infections. 

Can I get Chicken Pox if vaccinated?

Yes.

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